Squadron Scrapbook
Port Lyautey/Kenitra

Page Forty Five



Next Page

Go Direct to Port Lyautey Scrapbook Page (1), (2), (3), (4), (5), (6) (7), (8), (9), (10), (11), (12), (13), (14), (15), (16), (17), (18), (19), (20), (21), (22), (23), (24), (26), (27), (28), (29), (30), (31), (32), (33), (34), (35), (37), (38), (39), (40), (41), (42), (43), (44), (46), (47), (48), (49), (50), (51), (52), (53), (54),

Return to Scrapbook Page One

Return to Home Page

Additional photos from Kent Wagoner's Morocco collection. The photos on this page were taken by Kent on a visit to the Roman ruins of Vulibilis, (about three hours drive east of Kenitra on the road to Fez) one of the more interesting and least known to the members of VR-24. Editor's note: Once having a population of 20,000, Volubilis became part of the Roman province Mauretania Tingitania under Emperor Claudius in A.D. 45. The site includes ruins of the public forum, arches of the Basilica courthouse and pillars of the temple to the god Jupiter.


Anyone who has photos, stories, and material they wish to share is encouraged to send them to Dick Prather, Webmaster/Editor of the VR-24 website.

(wagoner)

Photo of the Volubilis Capitoline Temple Of Jupiter, Juno, and Minerva. Some of what is shown was reconstructed by the French, including the steps and columns. Note the stork nest atop one of the thirty-foot high columns.

(wagoner)

The remnants of a row of arches that once lined both sides of this, the main street of Volubilis.

(wagoner)

View through row of the three arches. Research indicates that shops and houses once occupied the area behind the arches.

(wagoner)

Arches mark entries to the Volubilis basillica.

(wagoner)

Another view of one of the basilica arches.

(wagoner)

Every Roman town of any size had some sort of military, and a triumphal arch denoting victories over ememies of the day. Research shows this, the Arch of Caracalla was dedicated to the Roman Emperor who extended citizenship to people living in Rome's African outposts.

(wagoner)

A closer look at the triumphal arch at Volubilis.

(wagoner)

The romans made extensive use of mosaics to enhance the beauty of not only public buildings but their dwellings. This mosaic appears to be divided into eight segments, each depicting groups of animals; either known to be from Africa, or perhaps from various parts of the Roman Empire. This mosaic was in the floor of the House of Orpheus.

(wagoner)

This particular mosaic depicts Bacchus encountering the sleeping Ariadne, and is located in the House of the Ephebe in Volubilis.

(wagoner)

Research shows this remarkably well preserved mosaic to be a depiction of Dionysos and the Seasons.

(wagoner)

Some mosaics were quite realiatic while others were somewhat fanciful, such as the poroises in this depiction.

(wagoner)

This shot shows one of the Volubilis public baths.

(wagoner)

The town of Moulay Idris on a hill above Volubilis is one of the most holy in Morocco. It is said to have become the first bastion of Islam in Morocco sometime in the seventh century.

Top of Page

Next Page

Go Direct to Port Lyautey Scrapbook Page (1), (2), (3), (4), (5), (6) (7), (8), (9), (10), (11), (12), (13), (14), (15), (16), (17), (18), (19), (20), (21), (22), (23), (24), (26), (27), (28), (29), (30), (31), (32), (33), (34), (35), (37), (38), (39), (40), (41), (42), (43), (44), (46), (47), (48), (49), (50), (51), (52), (53), (54),

Return to Scrapbook Page One

Return to Home Page

Copyright 2002 VR-24 Association