Squadron Scrapbook
Port Lyautey/Kenitra

Page Forty One



Next Page

Go Direct to Port Lyautey Scrapbook Page (1), (2), (3), (4), (5), (6) (7), (8), (9), (10), (11), (12), (13), (14), (15), (16), (17), (18), (19), (20), (21), (22), (23), (24), (26), (27), (28), (29), (30), (31), (32), (33), (34), (35), (37), (38), (39), (40), (42), (43), (44), (45), (46), (47), (48), (49), (50), (51), (52), (53), (54),

Return to Scrapbook Page One

Return to Home Page

Kent Wagoner took advantage of the opportunities to see many of Morocco's attractions. The photos on this and the following pages document his travel adventures while assigned to VR-24.


Anyone who has photos, stories, and material they wish to share is encouraged to send them to Dick Prather, Webmaster/Editor of the VR-24 website.

(wagoner)

Among the places most often visited first was Rabat, roughly thirty miles south of Kenitra. Usually every first trip to that city included a visit to the old walled town of Rabat. This photo shows the Oudala Casbah Gate, one of several gates into the walled town.

(wagoner)

The medina located within the walls of the old town was typified by narrow streets cluttered with open air markets and vendors willing to haggle over prices of their wares.

(wagoner)

Many locals lived and did their shopping in the medina. And, of course, tourists could make very good deals in some of the medina stalls, but the old saying 'buyer beware' was never more true.

(wagoner)

Another 'must see' in Rabat was the ruins of the Hassan Mosque. Construction began near the end of the twelvth century. It was envisioned to be the largest mosque ever built but was never completed. The tower shown here was to be the minarette.

(wagoner)

Viewed from the top of the tower the array of incomplete columns hint at the size the mosque had it been completed.

(wagoner)

Some idea of the size of the Hassan Tower can be seen by the tiny window part way up its face where two faces are just visible.

(wagoner)

The view from the top of the Hassan Tower took in the old city of Rabat on the nort side of the Oued Bou Regreb (river).

(wagoner)

Though silted up in more modern times it was from the Oued Bou Regreb that pirates used to 'sally forth' and prey on unfortunate, or less well armed seafarers.

(wagoner)

After wandering the streets of the medina those in the know often stopped in at this restaurant, called the Tea Room by U.S. Servicemen and their families, which provided a pleasant place to eat and a view of of the Bou Regreb.

Top of Page

Next Page

Go Direct to Port Lyautey Scrapbook Page (1), (2), (3), (4), (5), (6) (7), (8), (9), (10), (11), (12), (13), (14), (15), (16), (17), (18), (19), (20), (21), (22), (23), (24), (26), (27), (28), (29), (30), (31), (32), (33), (34), (35), (37), (38), (39), (40), (42), (43), (44), (45), (46), (47), (48), (49), (50), (51), (52), (53), (54),

Return to Scrapbook Page One

Return to Home Page

Copyright 2002 VR-24 Association